19. Quezon City, Philippines.

photography is like food. you just can't get enough when you taste that first bite.

nevver:

“The desire to feel like an individual is a false need instigated by capitalism to make us productive in the social factory and to make us consume more in pursuit of a reified authenticity.”

nevver:

“The desire to feel like an individual is a false need instigated by capitalism to make us productive in the social factory and to make us consume more in pursuit of a reified authenticity.”

i feel you, bro
homedesigning:

Open, Modern spaces with Few Pops of Color
lovequotesrus:

Photo Courtesy: scottzzzz

lovequotesrus:

Photo Courtesy: scottzzzz

(Source: vivasuvida, via asdfghjkllove)

nu-hella:

immikey:

OMG

this will never not be necessary.

(Source: myface-vs-thebottle, via dorkvader)

lovequotesrus:

Photo Courtesy: callistooo

“L’homme qui ment” (1968) - Alain Robbe-Grillet

“L’homme qui ment” (1968) - Alain Robbe-Grillet

(Source: kittenmeats, via lightingstrike)

9gag:

(via 9GAG - WTF is this?)
petercoffin:

Brilliant, hats off to the creator of this.
follow for goodness sake!

petercoffin:

Brilliant, hats off to the creator of this.

follow for goodness sake!

(Source: dumbrunningsonic, via petercoffin)

todaysdocument:

After it was captured nearly three years earlier, the battle to retake the island of Luzon in the Philippines from Japanese forces began on January 9, 1945 with a naval bombardment followed by an amphibious landing.

  1. USS Pennsylvania and a battleship of Colorado class followed by three cruisers move in line into Lingayen Gulf preceding the landing on Luzon. Philippines, January 1945
  2. A line of Coast Guard landing barges, sweeping through the waters of Lingayen Gulf, carries the first wave of invaders to the beaches of Luzon, after a terrific naval bombardment of Japanese shore positions on January 9, 1945
theweekmagazine:

The year: 1985The product: Nintendo Entertainment SystemThe result: HitAfter  a successful two-year stint in Japan, the Nintendo Entertainment System  wowed CES-goers with its 8-bit gaming. The spectacle did more than  enthrall a generation of bored school kids, it also revived the U.S.  video game market from its apocalyptic outlook post-Atari fallout. The Daily rounds up the great successes (and catastrophic failures) of CES

theweekmagazine:

The year: 1985
The product: Nintendo Entertainment System
The result: Hit

After a successful two-year stint in Japan, the Nintendo Entertainment System wowed CES-goers with its 8-bit gaming. The spectacle did more than enthrall a generation of bored school kids, it also revived the U.S. video game market from its apocalyptic outlook post-Atari fallout. The Daily rounds up the great successes (and catastrophic failures) of CES

fuckyeahvalhalla:

Maybe this isn’t a newsflash to anyone but me, but, um, the Moai “heads” on Easter Island have bodies. Because some of the statues are set deep into the ground, and because the heads on the statues are disproportionately large, many people (myself included) tend to think of them as just big heads. But the bodies (generally not including legs, though there is at least one kneeling statue) are there — in many cases, underground. What’s even more interesting — there are petroglyphs (rock markings) that have been preserved below the soil level, where they have been protected from erosion. This research report has been making the rounds; it discusses recent progress by The Easter Island Statue Project to uncover, study, and catalogue two statues. It includes (among the dry details of the research) a day-by-day journal of the work, as well as remarkable photographs showing the petroglyphs and team members excavating. Above is an image from a previous excavation (source unknown) that shows you the scale of the statues, and how deep they were buried. (Note: visitors are prohibited from climbing on the Moai; the expedition pictured above appears to predate the EISP and the current practice of conservation.)
For more on the Easter Island statues, read more about the EISP, read their extensive research reports, and check out the Wikipedia page on Moai (which also discusses the fairly well-known fact that many of the statuesused to have hats or possibly topknots, known as pukao). Also interesting is the back story of archaeology on Easter Island (also known as Rapa Nui); apparently the island has been the subject of archaeological research for 119 years.
(Via Jason Scott.)

fuckyeahvalhalla:

Maybe this isn’t a newsflash to anyone but me, but, um, the Moai “heads” on Easter Island have bodies. Because some of the statues are set deep into the ground, and because the heads on the statues are disproportionately large, many people (myself included) tend to think of them as just big heads. But the bodies (generally not including legs, though there is at least one kneeling statue) are there — in many cases, underground. What’s even more interesting — there are petroglyphs (rock markings) that have been preserved below the soil level, where they have been protected from erosion. This research report has been making the rounds; it discusses recent progress by The Easter Island Statue Project to uncover, study, and catalogue two statues. It includes (among the dry details of the research) a day-by-day journal of the work, as well as remarkable photographs showing the petroglyphs and team members excavating. Above is an image from a previous excavation (source unknown) that shows you the scale of the statues, and how deep they were buried. (Note: visitors are prohibited from climbing on the Moai; the expedition pictured above appears to predate the EISP and the current practice of conservation.)

For more on the Easter Island statues, read more about the EISP, read their extensive research reports, and check out the Wikipedia page on Moai (which also discusses the fairly well-known fact that many of the statuesused to have hats or possibly topknots, known as pukao). Also interesting is the back story of archaeology on Easter Island (also known as Rapa Nui); apparently the island has been the subject of archaeological research for 119 years.

(Via Jason Scott.)

(Source: , via bregma)

did-you-kno:

It also helps in understanding what is and what is not socially acceptable.
Source

did-you-kno:

It also helps in understanding what is and what is not socially acceptable.

Source

(via did-you-kno)

9gag:

Childhood